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Antigone è un dramma in un atto unico di Jean Anouilh scritto nel e pubblicato nel [nascondi]. subiecte.info Libera la cultura. Dona il tuo 5× a Wikimedia Italia. Scrivi subiecte.info Antigone is a tragedy by Sophocles written in or before BC. Of the three Theban plays "The Jayne Lecture: Title Deeds: Translating a Classic" (PDF). Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society. (4): – Archived from the original. by Ettore Mazzocca: Antigone furiosa (Italian Edition). ISBN: # | Date: Description: PDFc5 | Questa pubblicazione tratta l'Antígona furiosa di.


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Antigone è una tragedia di Sofocle, rappresentata per la prima volta ad Atene alle Grandi Dionisie del a.C.. L'opera appartiene al ciclo di. subiecte.info - Liceo Ginnasio Statale Domenico Cirillo. download del file pdf - Liceo Artistico. Guarda la presentazione in pdf - Liceo Artistico. Get this from a library! Antigone. [Sophocles.; Reginald Gibbons; Charles Segal] - - Publisher's description: Echoing through western culture for more than two.

Advanced Search Find a Library. Find a copy in the library Finding libraries that hold this item Zeus is referenced a total of 13 times by name in the entire play, and Apollo is referenced only as a personification of prophecy. Translated by Charles B. For more information, see Help: Inferior vector version available Self-published work PD-self. He initially seems willing to forsake Antigone, but when Haemon gently tries to persuade his father to spare Antigone, claiming that "under cover of darkness the city mourns for the girl", the discussion deteriorates, and the two men are soon bitterly insulting each other.

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Italiano antigone pdf

Write a review Rate this item: Preview this item Preview this item. Antigone Author: Oxford ; New York: Oxford University Press, Greek tragedy in new translations.

English View all editions and formats Summary: Publisher's description: Echoing through western culture for more than two millennia, Sophocles' play has been a touchstone of thinking about human conflict and human tragedy, the role of the divine in human life, and the degree to which men and women are the creators of their own destiny.

This exciting new translation of the Antigone is both extremely faithful to the Greek and poetically striking and convincing. Click here for electronic book ebookcentral. Show all links. Allow this favorite library to be seen by others Keep this favorite library private. Find a copy in the library Finding libraries that hold this item Print version: Document, Internet resource Document Type: Reginald Gibbons Charles Segal. This translation of the Antigone is both extremely faithful to the Greek.

Read more Reviews Editorial reviews. Publisher Synopsis Segal's introduction and notes by themselves make this book worth buying: User-contributed reviews Add a review and share your thoughts with other readers.

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File:Arbre généalogique Antigone.pdf

Similar Items Related Subjects: Linked Data More info about Linked Data. Primary Entity http: Book , schema: MediaObject , schema: The Date of Antigone -- 2. Intangible ;. InformationResource , genont: With her last breath, she cursed her husband.

Creon blames himself for everything that has happened, and, a broken man, he asks his servants to help him inside. The order he valued so much has been protected, and he is still the king, but he has acted against the gods and lost his children and his wife as a result. After Creon condemns himself, the leader of the chorus closes by saying that although the gods punish the proud, punishment brings wisdom. Antigone was written at a time of national fervor.

In BC, shortly after the play was performed, Sophocles was appointed as one of the ten generals to lead a military expedition against Samos. It is striking that a prominent play in a time of such imperialism contains little political propaganda, no impassioned apostrophe , and, with the exception of the epiklerate the right of the daughter to continue her dead father's lineage , [5] and arguments against anarchy, makes no contemporary allusion or passing reference to Athens.

It does, however, expose the dangers of the absolute ruler, or tyrant, in the person of Creon, a king to whom few will speak freely and openly their true opinions, and who therefore makes the grievous error of condemning Antigone, an act which he pitifully regrets in the play's final lines. Athenians, proud of their democratic tradition, would have identified his error in the many lines of dialogue which emphasize that the people of Thebes believe he is wrong, but have no voice to tell him so.

Italiano antigone pdf

Athenians would identify the folly of tyranny. The Chorus in Antigone departs significantly from the chorus in Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes , the play of which Antigone is a continuation.

The chorus in Seven Against Thebes is largely supportive of Antigone's decision to bury her brother. Here, the chorus is composed of old men who are largely unwilling to see civil disobedience in a positive light.

The chorus also represents a typical difference in Sophocles' plays from those of both Aeschylus and Euripides. A chorus of Aeschylus' almost always continues or intensifies the moral nature of the play, while one of Euripides' frequently strays far from the main moral theme. The chorus in Antigone lies somewhere in between; it remains within the general moral and the immediate scene, but allows itself to be carried away from the occasion or the initial reason for speaking.

Pdf italiano antigone

In this play Sophocles raises a number of questions: Should Polyneices, who committed a serious crime that threatened the city, be given burial rituals, or should his body be left unburied as prey for scavenging animals? Should someone who attempts to bury him in defiance of Creon be punished in an especially cruel and horrible way?

In this play, Creon is not presented as a monster, but as a leader who is doing what he considers right and justified by the state. The chorus is presented as a group of citizens who, though they may feel uneasy about the treatment of the corpse, respect Creon and what he is doing.

The chorus is sympathetic to Antigone only when she is led off to her death. The city is of primary importance to the chorus. Most of the arguments to save her center on a debate over which course adheres best to strict justice. Both Antigone and Creon claim divine sanction for their actions; but Tiresias the prophet supports Antigone's claim that the gods demand Polyneices' burial.

It is not until the interview with Tiresias that Creon transgresses and is guilty of sin. He had no divine intimation that his edict would be displeasing to the Gods and against their will. He is here warned that it is, but he defends it and insults the prophet of the Gods. This is his sin, and it is this which leads to his punishment.

Pdf italiano antigone

The terrible calamities that overtake Creon are not the result of his exalting the law of the state over the unwritten and divine law which Antigone vindicates, but are his intemperance which led him to disregard the warnings of Tiresias until it was too late.

This is emphasized by the Chorus in the lines that conclude the play. According to the legal practice of classical Athens, Creon is obliged to marry his closest relative Haemon to the late king's daughter in an inverted marriage rite, which would oblige Haemon to produce a son and heir for his dead father in law.

Creon would be deprived of grandchildren and heirs to his lineage — a fact which provides a strong realistic motive for his hatred against Antigone. This modern perspective has remained submerged for a long time.

His interpretation is in three phases: In the first two lines of the first strophe, in the translation Heidegger used, the chorus says that there are many strange things on earth, but there is nothing stranger than man.

Beginnings are important to Heidegger, and he considered those two lines to describe primary trait of the essence of humanity within which all other aspects must find their essence. Those two lines are so fundamental that the rest of the verse is spent catching up with them.

The authentic Greek definition of humankind is the one who is strangest of all.

Opera:Antigone (Sofocle)

Man is deinon in the sense that he is the terrible, violent one, and also in the sense that he uses violence against the overpowering. Man is twice deinon. When Antigone opposes Creon, her suffering the uncanny, is her supreme action.

An important issue still debated regarding Sophocles' Antigone is the problem of the second burial. When she poured dust over her brother's body, Antigone completed the burial rituals and thus fulfilled her duty to him. Having been properly buried, Polyneices' soul could proceed to the underworld whether or not the dust was removed from his body. However, Antigone went back after his body was uncovered and performed the ritual again, an act that seems to be completely unmotivated by anything other than a plot necessity so that she could be caught in the act of disobedience, leaving no doubt of her guilt.

More than one commentator has suggested that it was the gods, not Antigone, who performed the first burial, citing both the guard's description of the scene and the chorus's observation. Gilbert Norwood explains Antigone's performance of the second burial in terms of her stubbornness. His argument says that had Antigone not been so obsessed with the idea of keeping her brother covered, none of the deaths of the play would have happened.

This argument states that if nothing had happened, nothing would have happened, and doesn't take much of a stand in explaining why Antigone returned for the second burial when the first would have fulfilled her religious obligation, regardless of how stubborn she was. This leaves that she acted only in passionate defiance of Creon and respect to her brother's earthly vessel.

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Tycho von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff justifies the need for the second burial by comparing Sophocles' Antigone to a theoretical version where Antigone is apprehended during the first burial. In this situation, news of the illegal burial and Antigone's arrest would arrive at the same time and there would be no period of time in which Antigone's defiance and victory could be appreciated.

Rose maintains that the solution to the problem of the second burial is solved by close examination of Antigone as a tragic character. Being a tragic character, she is completely obsessed by one idea, and for her this is giving her brother his due respect in death and demonstrating her love for him and for what is right. When she sees her brother's body uncovered, therefore, she is overcome by emotion and acts impulsively to cover him again, with no regards to the necessity of the action or its consequences for her safety.

Bonnie Honig uses the problem of the second burial as the basis for her claim that Ismene performs the first burial, and that her pseudo-confession before Creon is actually an honest admission of guilt. A well established theme in Antigone is the right of the individual to reject society's infringement on her freedom to perform a personal obligation. The contrasting views of Creon and Antigone with regard to laws higher than those of state inform their different conclusions about civil disobedience.

Creon demands obedience to the law above all else, right or wrong. He says that "there is nothing worse than disobedience to authority" An. Antigone responds with the idea that state law is not absolute, and that it can be broken in civil disobedience in extreme cases, such as honoring the gods, whose rule and authority outweigh Creon's.

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In Antigone , Sophocles asks the question, which law is greater: Sophocles votes for the law of the gods. He does this in order to save Athens from the moral destruction which seems imminent. Sophocles wants to warn his countrymen about hubris, or arrogance, because he believes this will be their downfall. In Antigone, the hubris of Creon is on display. Creon's decree to leave Polyneices unburied in itself makes a bold statement about what it means to be a citizen, and what constitutes abdication of citizenship.

It was the firmly kept custom of the Greeks that each city was responsible for the burial of its citizens. Herodotus discussed how members of each city would collect their own dead after a large battle to bury them. Since he is a citizen of Thebes, it would have been natural for the Thebans to bury him. Creon is telling his people that Polyneices has distanced himself from them, and that they are prohibited from treating him as a fellow-citizen and burying him as is the custom for citizens.

In prohibiting the people of Thebes from burying Polyneices, Creon is essentially placing him on the level of the other attackers—the foreign Argives. For Creon, the fact that Polyneices has attacked the city effectively revokes his citizenship and makes him a foreigner. As defined by this decree, citizenship is based on loyalty. It is revoked when Polyneices commits what in Creon's eyes amounts to treason.

When pitted against Antigone's view, this understanding of citizenship creates a new axis of conflict. Antigone does not deny that Polyneices has betrayed the state, she simply acts as if this betrayal does not rob him of the connection that he would have otherwise had with the city.

Creon, on the other hand, believes that citizenship is a contract; it is not absolute or inalienable, and can be lost in certain circumstances. These two opposing views — that citizenship is absolute and undeniable and alternatively that citizenship is based on certain behavior — are known respectively as citizenship 'by nature' and citizenship 'by law.

Antigone's determination to bury Polyneices arises from a desire to bring honor to her family, and to honor the higher law of the gods. She repeatedly declares that she must act to please "those that are dead" An. In the opening scene, she makes an emotional appeal to her sister Ismene saying that they must protect their brother out of sisterly love, even if he did betray their state. Antigone believes that there are rights that are inalienable because they come from the highest authority, or authority itself, that is the divine law.

While he rejects Antigone's actions based on family honor, Creon appears to value family himself. When talking to Haemon, Creon demands of him not only obedience as a citizen, but also as a son. Creon says "everything else shall be second to your father's decision" "An. His emphasis on being Haemon's father rather than his king may seem odd, especially in light of the fact that Creon elsewhere advocates obedience to the state above all else.

It is not clear how he would personally handle these two values in conflict, but it is a moot point in the play, for, as absolute ruler of Thebes, Creon is the state, and the state is Creon. It is clear how he feels about these two values in conflict when encountered in another person, Antigone: In Antigone as well as the other Theban Plays, there are very few references to the gods. Hades is the god who is most commonly referred to, but he is referred to more as a personification of Death.

Zeus is referenced a total of 13 times by name in the entire play, and Apollo is referenced only as a personification of prophecy. This lack of mention portrays the tragic events that occur as the result of human error, and not divine intervention.

The gods are portrayed as chthonic , as near the beginning there is a reference to "Justice who dwells with the gods beneath the earth. This contrasts with the other Athenian tragedians, who reference Olympus often. Antigone's love for family is shown when she buries her brother, Polyneices. Yorgos Tzavellas adapted the play into a film which he also directed. It featured Irene Papas as Antigone. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

This article is about the play by Sophocles. For the main character in the play, see Antigone. Antigone in front of the dead Polyneices by Nikiforos Lytras The Three Theban Plays: Antigone, Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus. Translated by Robert Fagles. New York: The Theban Plays Penguin Classics.

iNTERCULTURAL tRANSLATION iNTERSEMIOTIC

Translated by E. The Penguin Group. The Drama: Historical Publishing Company. Translated by Charles B. Aurora, Colorado: The Davies Group, Publishers.