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The spectacular now tim tharp pdf

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THE. SPECTACULAR. NOW by. Scott Neustadter. &. Michael H. Weber. Based on the novel by Tim Tharp. Second Draft. August 24, Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. Starred Review. Unlike most high school seniors, Sutter Keely—the narrator of this smart, superbly written novel—is . Read Online or Download The Spectacular Now by Tim Tharp in PDF EPub. Hello fellow readers!,.. +. Good News for an ebook of The Spectacular Now by Tim.


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Also by Tim Tharp. Praise for The Spectacular Now. Copyright . “'Cause my mom made my dad move away and now he's in Florida.” I'm like, “Aw shit. This National Book Award Finalist is now a major motion picture -- one of the most buzzed-about films at Sundance , starring Shailene Woodley (star of The. SPECTACULAR. NOW by. Scott Neustadter. &. Michael H. Weber. Based on the novel by Tim Tharp. GREEN Production Draft. July XX,

My rating: Click here. What shattered me the most was the book's ending. The gut-check of that. Or maybe not.

Once when he was facing a spanking, we schemed and plotted, arming ourselves with sticks for weapons. We were thick as thieves. But we all deal with the stress and trauma of childhood in different ways; we all have our coping mechanisms. As we grew up we fumbled our way down different roads, which led us further and further apart. I learned how to live inside my own skin, fired to hardness like pottery. He learned to smother everything under a chemically induced happiness.

I can so easily feel the pain seeping out of the cracks in his bonhomie: He misses his Dad. This book captures so much of the essence of addiction, and the first person narration lets us in on all of the bullshit he feeds himself to cope with the loneliness and self-hatred. I know that the ending seems dark, but I found a bit of hope in this story. Aimee and Sutter are two lost kids, and while there are moments of honesty and beauty in their relationship, they cannot build anything solid when they are both dealing or not dealing with so many internal battles.

View all 26 comments. May 13, K-L rated it it was ok Shelves: The best way to deal with it is to live in the now, pursue all the pleasure and deal with none of the grief. He takes a purely hedonistic, somewhat philosophical world view throughout the book. Tharp gives Sutton a clear, blunt, narrative voice but when it comes to character development, Sutter stays the same person from point A to point B, even with inserting "Life is a big, screwed-up joke with its ups and downs.

Tharp gives Sutton a clear, blunt, narrative voice but when it comes to character development, Sutter stays the same person from point A to point B, even with inserting numerous potential turning points for him. Sutter defines himself as "God's own drunk". He doesn't confront his own problems, despite supposedly 'helping' new love Aimee come out of her shell.

He's ultimately a likeable character, but as I read on, he became like a guest who has overstayed his welcome. As for the plot, where did it go? The plot could easily just have been a set of serial anecdotes. There are too many loose ends, no closure. You're left with too many questions, and no answers--and not in a good way.

Maybe that's how Tharp intended for it to go, a story that pantomimes real life for pleasure-seekers. Real life doesn't have closure; sometimes we end up shelving our problems in the back of our drunk brains as life goes on. I guess that's ultimately the true message of the novel, hopeless as it is. Sutton had a drinking problem, family issues, a skewed view of life, but in the end, he brushes everything aside and lives in the "Spectacular Now". Well-written, funny, but half-hearted in terms of plot and character development.

Instead of a real story, we get a portrait of a hedonistic, broken yet charismatic boy who approaches life with a swagger in his step, a joke in his eyes, and a flask in his hand.

View all 4 comments. Jan 09, Katrina Passick Lumsden rated it it was amazing. Holy crap, this is a good book. A heavy book. This is one of those books that I went into thinking it was going to be a romance with a message, but pretty all-around feel-good. I mean, yeah, there's a message, all right, but this book isn't exactly a fluffy candy feel-good story. So don't go into it thinking it will be. It's funny and philosophical and introspective and reminiscent. Sutter's voice is so authentically teenager that it's obvious Tim Tharp never completely forgot that pha Holy crap, this is a good book.

Sutter's voice is so authentically teenager that it's obvious Tim Tharp never completely forgot that phase in his own life. Some of us do remember what it was like to be a teenager. How much is sucked at times, but also how amazingly high you could feel even when everything around you was total shit.

It's really hard to encapsulate all the things going through my head after reading a book like this.

I just finished it, so while the story and all its intricacies are still fresh, it's also It messes with my ability to put everything in words. So I suppose I'll let Tharp's words do it for me: There's this sense of being super-alive. You're in on a secret that all the dull, sleeping people don't know about. Unlike them, you're alert and aware of existing right here in this precise moment between what happened and what's going to happen.

The Spectacular Now PDF

I mean, that's what separates us from the animals. That and haircuts. It never does with dreams. They aren't anything anyway but lifesavers to cling to so you don't drown. Life is an ocean, and most everyone's holding on to some kind of dream to keep afloat. Tharp on his realistic, unbiased portrayal of teenagers. His characters have sex, drink, and do drugs, but he never crosses the line into moralizing or overdramatizing.

The kids aren't getting so wasted they rape each other or set cars on fire or have dumpster babies, but neither are they preaching about how wrong it is or having serious internal debates about whether or not they should have sex. Things just are , and that's missing in a lot of literature. I've noticed the "to sex or not to sex" dilemma pops up in a lot of YA fiction written by women, and I think it's a subject that really needs to be treated a little more fairly. People seem to think that sex is the end-all, be-all of teenage stories, when really, being a teenager is about a lot more than hormones.

Sometimes, your teenage son or daughter having sex isn't the thing you should be worrying about most.

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I couldn't get over Sutter. Kid breaks my heart every time I think of him. So much love to give, so much potential for emotional greatness, an untapped inner prosperity that some of us only dream of having.

He's such a cynic at heart, but tries so hard to be optimistic, and then his optimism shines through in such a twisted, almost nihilistic way. He can't plan for the future because he has no hope, but he can't come to grips with that.

He's one of those guys that's in denial all the time. He's not depressed because, hey, what does he have to be depressed about?

He's not an alcoholic because, hey, he can quit any time he wants to. He's not in love with anyone because, hey, what is love, anyway?

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On the surface he seems really superficial, but as you get to know him, you see the kid's got a heart bigger than most and, sadly, it's been beaten to a bloody pulp and I'm not sure if there's much anyone can do about it. Like I said, it's heavy. But a really, really good heavy. View all 3 comments. May 31, Philip rated it really liked it Shelves: Call me an idiot if you like, but I didn't realize this book existed until a week ago.

I ended up seeing the theatrical adaptation at a free screening when it first came out in not really knowing what I was getting myself into except, of course, a movie theater- for free but the movie affected me and I fell in love with it because it immediately connected to my experience as a young adult without resorting to terminal illnesses or similar plot devices to get me invested int 4.

I ended up seeing the theatrical adaptation at a free screening when it first came out in not really knowing what I was getting myself into except, of course, a movie theater- for free but the movie affected me and I fell in love with it because it immediately connected to my experience as a young adult without resorting to terminal illnesses or similar plot devices to get me invested into the lives of the characters. It's embarrassing for me to admit that I chalked it up to the screenwriters as being the brilliant masterminds behind the story, when really it's Tim Tharp who gave them the prime material to work with.

It wasn't until good ol' Goodreads suggested the book to me that I realized my life had been a lie. I immediately started reading and was affected all over again in the best way. It's kind of hard for me to separate the book from the movie after having seen it and my review would probably be a little different if I were able to differentiate them adequately.

For example, my perception of Aimee might be a little different if I hadn't already fallen in love with Shailene Woodley's portrayal of her. Without her filling in the gaps, would I find book Aimee and her relationship with Sutter as believable?

I don't know, but I think probably not. Or not as much. And that ending Would I hate it if I didn't supplement it with the ending of the movie? I mean, I like to tell myself that I respect "realist" endings- ones that don't need to end happy and tie up all loose ends. But deep down I'm a sentimentalist, dang-it! I choose to hold on to hope, just like Aimee, and for that reason, I love this book.

There's no way to know anymore View all 10 comments. So I've been seeing the movie in stores and I was curious so I picked up the book I must say that it was not the greatest book I've ever read but it wasn't the worst. So I would give this book 3. At times this book just sort of dragged on and on.

I get it that it's about high school kids trying to find their way in life but I don't know just something about this book rubbed me the wrong way. Decent enough I guess. Sutter was alright. I'm surprised he doesn't have liver cancer by how mu So I've been seeing the movie in stores and I was curious so I picked up the book I'm surprised he doesn't have liver cancer by how much that bro drinks.

Aimee was probably the one redeeming quality about this book. I don't know definitely won't read this book again View all 12 comments.

Fans of The Catcher in the Rye. Recommended to Alyssa by: I happen to know three or four. I loved Sutter, this broken, broken boy. I think Tharp reflected alcoholism realistically and suitably on Sutter, even if sometimes it was hard for me, loving Sutter and all, to handle a 7UP and whiskey nearly every scene. Sutter starts out a drunk in the beginning of the book, and not many changes happen with him as we go along. Cassidy, after Sutter, would have had to be my favourite character.

Not only did Tharp give her a personality - ex-girlfriend's are real people, you know - but he gave her rendition and space to show why Sutter loved her in the first place. A lot of the time, you'll read about an ex-girlfriend that's a complete bitch, and you wonder how the main character could love that. Cassidy, even if not a huge character, sort of made the book for me, as did Ricky, the multi-dimensional best friend who was exactly perfect and nothing like other best friends who have all the potential but never make anything of it.

Tharp presented the life of teens as well as he did alcoholism.

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I think he chose a risky subject to write about — taking a look at other reviews, people seem to think he went overboard — but that he did it justice. I wish for you to read this book. Here we go.. It would have been a 5stars book except for Aimee I couldn't figure her out and she was a bit too naive for my taste; all that planning scared me to be honest..

I might need to re-read the last page. Can I also have one more page please? I have tons of quotes that I liked to testify if you won't have my word - The writing - I just picked this book up and couldn't put it down. I didn't want to. It's not like we don't do those things now, but we are more quite about it, less free, more down-to-earth..

I thought it was supposed to be a light, funny read not sure where I got that idea from but at times it felt pretty heavy. And yes, there is swearing and drinking and some talk about sex, I am not sure why people keep warning about hese things in their reviews, where do you live in a bubble so you don't find that in real life?

No, no need to explain, I get that you don't like reading about those things I am getting bothered by other things too that don't seem to bother you one bit I just had it on the tip of my fingers, so I had to let it out. Also I am not sure how you do it the parenting stuff , but when I was young it only took my parents to not let me do some things and..

And even though there are drugs and a lot of drinks and driving while having a drink in this story, there are many other things that make this book worth reading Back to the point: Loved this book, Tim Tharp I am keeping my eyes on you now! Yes, I got it the first time around, she was fat and beautiful. You are the colors". I'm telling you, I'm getting old: View all 6 comments.

Nov 12, Greg rated it really liked it Shelves: This is a weird book. The book itself is pretty straight-forward, the narrator is a high school senior named Sutter who likes to drink and is the life of the party. The party to him though is all of life. He's always the life of the party even though most people probably don't realize the party is happening. He lives by the motto of 'embrace the weird', meaning just go with whatever happens and make the best of it.

Part of his embracing whatever happens is knocking back enough whiskey to make th This is a weird book.

Part of his embracing whatever happens is knocking back enough whiskey to make the weird palatable and normal. What's weird to me is that this is classified as a teen book. I don't want to come across as priggish or a prude or anything like that, but I usually figured teen books should have some kind of 'good' in them. They should be some kind of mini-little-morality-play.

Sutter should realize that his life is going no-where, he should have some moment where he sees that there needs to be more to life than acting like the fun jackass and being drunk all the time. If I substitute the drinking in the book for smoking copious amounts of pot on a daily basis Sutter isn't all that different from quite a few friends and acquaintances of mine in my late high school and college years.

Thinking of Sutter as some of my old friends, this song started to play in my head. The weird innocence of being young and fucked up, something that maybe it's fine to be but which doesn't really last and eventually becomes being a fucked up fuck up. As the book moved on I wanted to see Sutter learn something, and everytime he seemed to learn a lesson he would in no time show the bit of learning he did to be an aberration that was quickly corrected by another reckless action.

Even towards the end of the book the progress that the reader sees him make is put into relief by the very last chapter that can be seen as either a stand for youth against the encroachment of early adulthood or as someone who is never really going to learn anything as long as there are people willing to cheer him on for his antics.

The Spectacular Now

Which makes me think that instead of the wistful reminiscences of the Wilco song above Sutter's future is more likely going to be more like this darker Uncle Tupelo song. View all 9 comments. Aug 16, Cari rated it did not like it Shelves: Every time I read a book that is popular I almost always end up hating it.

What's wrong with me? Or maybe I should as what is wrong with everyone else?! I wanted to read this book before I went to go see the movie, but I only want to go see the movie so I can scope out the acting of the two main characters since they are both casted for Divergent. As soon as I read the first sentence of the book I should have just put the book down and walked away.

I did't like the style in which this book was w Every time I read a book that is popular I almost always end up hating it. I did't like the style in which this book was written, I felt like I was listening to a stupid self absorbed teenager talking non-sense. If this book was a person There was no plot, he just kept telling stories that didn't build anything, I'd often catch myself daydreaming while reading This book had no conflict.

Sorry having your main character being an alcoholic doesn't cut it as main conflict. I can't believe adults even allow their children to read this. If I had teens I would most certainly not allow them to read it. I absolutely hate alcohol, but this book glorifies it. The main character drinks and drinks and glorifies drinking, kids will read this book and be like "wow he's got something going here maybe I should try it.

I hate it. He talks about not remembering what happened the pervious night he was obviously black out drunk, anyone who knows anything KNOWs that being black out drunk, you can not drive safely. You can't even walk, but this kids some how does it every day with no consequences. Then tenes are reading this book and thinking it's no big deal!

It is a big deal! Jul 08, Basuhi rated it it was ok. She is too naive? Was there one? Sutter's drinking problem Alcoholism like his isn't some piece of cake to quit. Aimee turning into 2. Aimee turning into a lush. Moving in together. Oh just forget about it, here's his 7up and Goodbye. Everyone knows that if you want a good time, you call Sutter Keely. So Cassidy dumps him, and Sutter finds healing in the bottom of a whisky bottle. She has no self-esteem, a gambling mother and Walrus-like stepfather.

She wears a purple puffer jacket that makes her look like a Christmas ornament, and her best friend is a miniature tyrant. Sutter decides to take her under his wing, and not a moment too soon. Sutter Keely may be the life of every party, but at some point the lights always come on and the music eventually fades. I've been recommended this book for a solid five years now.

I bought it and added to the TBR pile, and would occasionally re-read the blurb or scan the first page — but I was never moved to read. And then I heard from Persnickety Snark that a film adaptation was screening to rave reviews at Sundance Film Festival. This intrigued me. Aimee is no nerd, but rather a downtrodden wallflower with the world on her shoulders.

This is not a romance — and that will frustrate some people. Tharp has such a great rhythm in this book. Tharp writes something delicious.

So I was really happy to see one movie review in particular that says there are long stretches of banter and blocks of back-and-forth dialogue between characters. But I revelled in its originality and honesty; I was so glad that Tharp took the road less travelled in teen romances, and the book is the better for it. Not now or any time in the future.

I will not have sex with her in a car. I will not have sex with her in a bar. I will not have sex with her in a tree. I will not have sex with her in a lavatory-ee.

I will not have sex with her in a chair. I will not have sex with her anywhere. Give me a hallelujah for Brother Sutter and his messianic complex. That means you think you have to go around trying to save everybody. Just this one girl. The ending is brutal perfection, and if Tharp had concluded any other way, then the entire book would have been a sell-out.

I'm not sure how I feel about this book.

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I'm going to sleep on it. Full review to come! Didn't turn out the way I hoped it would. And after some pondering I think I actually like it for that exact reason. It's the story of a high schooler that's partying a lot, drinking way too much and seemingly can't hold on to any relationships with girls.

Because at some point being fun and all isn't enough. You have to have some direction in which your life is going. And Sutter just doesn't. He lives in the spectacular now. The main character is simultaneously loveable and an ass.

He definitely Didn't turn out the way I hoped it would. He definitely has some serious problems and unappealing traits. But he's also got heart. He's not a role model and I really hope teenagers reading this book realize that. But I still liked him.

30 Days of Screenplays, Day 28: “The Spectacular Now”

At one point Aimee steps into his life. She's that nerdy and shy and good-natured and just really sweet girl. You only wish the best for her. And you think she just might be what Sutter needs and you hope he doesn't hurt her. And then everything was going in a different direction from what I expected. The book feels very real. Sometimes too real. Because me having to "listen" to Sutter talking like, well, a teenager got on my nerves quite a bit on several occasions.

I might be getting a little too old for YA. Or maybe not. There's still hope.

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Anyhow, the few annoying bits notwithstanding, this one was funny and sad and even deep sometimes and entertaining all the way through. And just when I was starting to get annoyed about the direction it took I realized I was wrong. After all, I really liked the ending and finally was able to appreciate what the author was doing here. Now I have to re-watch the movie, because even though I know I liked it, I clearly couldn't remember the details very well.

Good thing we've got that one lined up already. So, we've seen the movie last night and I have to say I didn't like it as much as the first time around. It stays close to the source material for most of its 95 minute running time. But it's just too short. Some events are left out, of course. And that's really inevitable and was okay. But the two main characters suffer the most from the short running time. They're just not that well developed in the film.

Even though the casting of Miles Teller as Sutter and Shailene Woodley as Aimee was just perfect, they both got shortchanged by the script. I'm not denying that the movie had emotional impact, especially towards the end.

But the characters' motivations became a lot clearer in the book. And even though that's almost always the case, there's a rather vast disparity here.

I also liked it better how the book ended in comparison to the movie.

PDF - The Spectacular Now

Don't know why they changed it. Oh well, I still liked it. But the book ruined it a little for me. The book: View all 30 comments. The Spectacular Now is a strange sort of book. I want to lecture it, to give it my own personal big-sister talking to. In some ways I wanted to hate it because the way it almost glorified teenage drinking and partying.

But I can't. Because even if I don't agree with Sutter's methods, he feels like a real believable teenager. Sometimes it's brave for a book to portray drinking I would call Sutter a teenage alcoholic but I don't think he would without ever getting preachy or putting on the parent The Spectacular Now is a strange sort of book.

Sometimes it's brave for a book to portray drinking I would call Sutter a teenage alcoholic but I don't think he would without ever getting preachy or putting on the parent hat.

It's disarming, but sometimes it's good for a book to rile us up and challenge what we think is right. Sutter is one of those kids, the party boy with a heart of gold. To some people this might seem unrealistic, but it's not.

I never knew a guy quite like Sutter, but I had a friend who was in and out of trouble in high school. For a goody-two-shoes like me, knowing him was a bit of a revelation. Yes he had problems, illegal ones, but he was a really good friend to me.

Sometime's it's easy to label someone as a "bad guy" but it's much more realistic and complicated to acknowledge that sometimes there are good people with good hearts who still do bad things. Sutter is like that. Yes he's probably an alcoholic, but he's trying to be a good friend and he really does genuinely cares about people.

He just doesn't believe he can be anything more than the party guy. I wanted that desperately, but came away much like I did with the novel. Most Memorable Dialogue: Sometimes you have to be serious.

I am serious. About what? About… not being serious. Did you even apply to college yet? Who needs it? I have everything I need right here. A job. A car. A beautiful woman. A text book? You got to live in the moment, Cass. A future. Most Memorable Moments: Like right there, in that moment, seeing how different they were, I wanted Sutter to walk away.

A glimpse at his potential future self. The gut-check of that. Raw and awesome. I really really wanted to love this script.

Which could be. I loved the John Green book! Easily the best book I read last year. But the movie? Sadly, not so much. Sooooo lacking. Very one-note. It needs high stakes. A crescendo of obstacles. Tough choices.